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Reminder: FSM 2017 CFP

Less than three weeks are left to submit your proposal!

Libre et change

Eeach year the FSM gather thousands of free software and libre culture actors in a dialogue with a large public. This year, we wish to bring the energies of the Libre community worldwide around Freedom And Change[^*].

[^*] In French, "libre et change" is a pun on "libre-échange" (free trade).

This common theme carries the contradiction of the promise, always delayed and never accomplished, of the 'free trade' economy that, like the promise of democracy or the Human Rights Charter, presupposes the equality of actors and chances. Despite the paradox of this egalitary will confronted to a completely different reality, with increasing inequalities and more obvious existential threats, the contribution of free software, both marginal in the respect of its ethical choices, and increasingly dominating the network technical infrastructure, demonstrates that it's not only possible but desirable to insist on the possibilities and coherence of an ethical discourse on freedom and the technical infrastructure fostering it.

FSM 2017

FSM 2017 follows a reduced edition in Paris, 2016, limited to the booming aspects, in a control society more and more terrified, of security, only able to offer the means of resistance to those who can see, beyond the fatalist discourse of power overtaken by events, the failures of an inadequate system and the means to bypass them, proper to the hacker spirit.

Such loss of impetus, or such quelling of freedom in a global atmosphere of threats to life won't surprise anyone. So, to bring back momentum and breath to our aspiration for a technology that integrates with human communities and sustains them, instead of restricting or negate them, we decided to draw our resources from the melting pot of a city rich in such contradictions, whose history grew with the mining and military industries, all destined to technique for its efficiency, and who nowadays got wiser in adopting a transversal perspective of design.

Standing firm on these two supports, well settled in locality, we can then welcome a worldwide gathering with a dimension beyond a simple resistance to "terrorist pressure", restrictions, and "communalist" recoils to confront them with strength and pay hommage to the technical and collective powers of free software, that can develop ways of reconciliation between technical and human development.

Hommage to Gilbert Simondon

Among major thinkers of our times, Saint-Étienne-born Gilbert Simondon disrupted the outlook of our contemporaries on technique as well as on the individual and the collective (with his notions of transindividual and transduction). If the influence of his thought remains marginal we must realize its depths and the new instruments to understand the tensions in our society so influenced by technological inventions.

Specialists of the thought of Simondon will enlighten the singularity of free software in our time all captivated by efficiency for itself, and remind us how much the path affects the significance of the produced objects.

Saint-Étienne Creative City of Design

FSM 2017 will take place at the Design City and in the buildings of Télécom Saint-Étienne. This year the city of Saint-Étienne carries the flame of UNESCO's _Creative City of Design, a prestigious program that we intend to illustrate. A small visit to the Design City website will replace the aesthetical orientation of this year's program in a larger scope than usually understood by the term often restricted to the domain of the arts: we intend to re-establish the social and citizen dimension of aesthetics, and contribute to a vision of free software in this sense. Considering the Libre aesthetics as engagement, participation, and cooperation, we want to insist on the central role that free technologies production must take in the evolution of everyday life, embracing a hybridization of the living and the technological according to citizen perspectives.

Following the tenth Biennal of Design of Saint-Étienne, whose common theme considers the "mutations of labor", we will envision the powers of Libre to contribute to the well-being and the transformation of society--a humane society built on ethical values of sharing of knowledge and the means of production at the heart of the Libre Movement.

Contribute to FSM 2017

Submit a proposal (until Mach 31): https://2017.rmll.info/cfp

Rupture & Continuity

In addition to traditional conferences (and lightning talks), workshops and the Community Village, we invite you to submit more participative interventions such as the expression of cooperative needs, exhibitions, performances, and a professional show. We also programmed early-evening shows to discover artists engaged in the Libre Movement. Please see What's New at FSM 2017? for more information.

Addressed Topics

We decided on 8 transversal topics to encourage a broad variety of submissions that are inscribed in the different sectors where free software operates. The public can discover and question the importance of stakes often unknown beyond concerned circles, and solutions to these issues brought forward by the Libre Movement.

Security: Between Transparency and Opacity

A major theme at FSM, a carrier of societal stakes all the more so important as they unfold in the world in ever-invasive form, computer security concerns not only nation-states, institutions, and the bigger economic players, but also small businesses and citizens, savvy or not. From virus to ransomware, from attacks perpetrated by organized crime or secret services, to vulnerabilities in software and hardware, from general incomprehension to oppressive laws and threats to security practioners themselves, whether you want it or not, whether you get it or not, security is a critical place in contemporary society. Security articulates a fragile balance between the need for systems transparency and the opacity required to protect privacy and to preserve collective institutions.

What are the issues facing engineers and hackers, what tools are available to discover, report, and correct vulnerabilities, and how free software can favor a safer world when the machine that comes with us becomes our enemy?

Science and Learning: Situation and perspectives

With the explosion of knowledge and scientific disciplines, its financial, ethical, and environmental stakes, science cannot anymore claim 'neutrality' that it boasted before the Holocaust, the atomic bomb, or the Zika virus. Long ago, with the Encyclopaedists, a bearer of a will to share knowledge, science is now eroded by economic interests, invaded by competitivity, and put under pressure to solve all of the world's problems, as it is addressed as one would address God to claim protection from His wrath.

Facing such issues, what role can free software play and what practices develop to give back to science the taste of sharing and wonder to which knowledge can bring us?

User Side: Diversity of Usage

Computers are now omnipresent, but technology production seems to have reduced usage to a simple consumption to which format one should conform since production mostly remains in other people's hands. The ethics of fundamental freedoms of free software and libre technologies give users the possibility to affect technological production and give it back to citizens and the collective, through dialogue with developers and a recognition of usage specificity that big promoters of proprietary technologies seem to ignore when they impose their 'global vision'. Be it customizing a program, adapt it to a different usage, make it accessible to all or respectful of cultures (deaf or ethnical), free software offers new perspectives unavailable to its competitors captured by the imperative of profitability and a racket mentality. However if free software conquered the servers, it remains weak in the dialogue with related disciplines of design, ergonomy, etc., and above all in its relative absence from daily life professions (architecture, craft, trade, accounting, fiscality, etc.) suitable for engaging users more in the Libre Movement.

What are then the advantages of free software to engage in a fruitful dialogue between these 'minorities' that indeed form the majority of our fellow citizens?

Server Side: Complexity of Stakes

The amplification of computer networks gave birth to giants who today capture the majority of traffic and the world's data. The energy necessary to satisfy the growing needs of the "digital economy" rises ceaselessly, creating data centers that consume as much as entire cities. Data transiting over the network range from banal to shocking, from entertainment to critical, in a back and forth movement ruled by technical, ethical, legal, and economic constraints whose scope largely exceed the capacity of human and institutional groups to grasp them. At the heart of this monster pulsate the bits of free software, a major instrument of this 'digital revolution'. And behind closed doors, savvy sysadmins make the world go round and remain invisible, or break things and get all the blame.

How system administration evolved with new techniques and greater scales? What does the Internet look like? What techniques are deployed to make it intelligible and better its functioning? What resources are necessary to its production? To what extent can free software contribute to the evolution of this public infrastructure, to which access is recognized as a fundamental right by the UN?

Sharing: Collective Aspects of the Libre Movement

If freedom to run a program (freedom 0) and to study how it works (freedom 1) are well-understood thanks to practical individual appropriation of these notions, collective freedoms of sharing (freedom 2) and contributing (freedom 3) often remain interpreted pragmatically in the sole domain of software. But it's with the interaction between developers and non-developers that the latter two freedom must be considered, as they unfold in the collective, in the affected communities, and meet problems that of course go beyond the technical domain only. It's in the domain of institutions notably that proprietary software find its privileged point of entry, with its captive users. Equally, in the legislative domain are arranged restrictions to the amplification of collaborative techniques, with 'software patents', the prohibition of threats to prohibit usage of free technologies or reverse engineering, etc. All domains that usually find few interest in software producers, or where they feel powerless to act. A child whose school imposes usage of privative software can only be in contact with the free software community through the social network of their fellow pupils or their family, but if themselves are forced to use de facto 'standardized' privative technology, the chances of technological emancipation shrink.

What bridges are available to socially palliate these anti-social lobbies whose pressure augments in our regions?

Hybridization: Uses of Free Software in the City

An element of response to the previous question concerns the recognition of sectors in which free software meets important sucess, for example in health and academic research, (sometimes) in activist networks, and hobbyists (hackerspaces, tinkerers...). Working hand in hand with successful practitioners can help bridge the gap between a population who can't fathom the importance of free technologies since they don't have proper access to them. Getting out of the labs and protected communities of savvy practioners, into the wider society and touch a larger public with examples where they wouldn't expect free software is often problematic since the 'digital divide' between hackers and the ordinary person requires pedagogy from the former and genuine interest on the latter.

What examples can be used to arouse people's interest in free technologies production? What sectors are most frustrated by an absence of alternative or flexibility in their control of the software, and what skills are needed to help things move towards a better response from the Libre Movement to ordinary people's computing needs? What institutional arrangements exist or need to exist in order to facilitate free software production beyond scratching an itch, to solve issues only addressed by proprietary software?

Programming: What Means to What Ends?

Writing software is not only a technical endeavor, it also affects what can be done with it. The art of programming is thus highly political, as the choice of algorithms, licenses, and supporting platforms have real effects on technology production, understood as technique deployed in society. Yet, as with any specialty with a high degree of knowledge, programming requires tools of the trade that facilitate the work. Free software has been creating a large amount of critical tools, languages, and methodologies to advance the craft, that are shared widely across all fields of computer science and the industry. From access to the source code and distributed development practice, to collaborative testing and open data formats, the Libre Movement has been at the forefront of making free technologies possible, in the spirit of science and culture, to share knowledge and advance community practice.

What does it entail for a software project to be free? What languages exist and how to choose them for a specific project? What tools are available to streamline a free software project from idea to production? What techniques are created to chase and solve bugs, or to avoid them entirely? How to deal with undocumented hardware? Which hardware platforms collaborate with free software developers? What methodologies and best practice enhance crafting free software? What new trends are embraced by the developer community and are they worth the adoption?

Libre Aesthetics: Engagement, Participation, Cooperation

Finally, we wish to engage reflexion on art and aesthetical thought. Lawrence Lessig famously wrote that 'code is law'. Increasingly, this means that software implements rules to which users must conform, sometimes without regard to existing law. Yet, programmers are often instruments in the hands of their employers, shaping reality under constraints they hardly choose. If satisfaction of ego (reputation) remains a primary engine for free software development, doesn't it mirror a sense of isolation, of dissociation that perspires all around us? We can define an aesthetics of free software with engagement, participation, and cooperation: engagement with the community, "to help your neighbor", participation of the community, because software developers can't alone devise solutions for cases they don't know about, and cooperation across disciplines, because software is not only a matter of code: it requires many different skills from mathematics and design to human sciences and geography, etc.. An aesthetics of free software is necessarily transdisciplinary and embraces complexity; it revolves around the human communities that decide to hybridize with technologies they choose consciously.

What are the new forms shaping the hybrid human-technology complex?

Other Topics

If you don't know where to place your intervention among the above topics, we welcome you to submit a proposal, do not hesitate. We're especially interested in proposals aiming to gather groups of programmers and their users.

Financial Support

In order to complete this year's budget and ensure a high quality of service, we're going to launch call to contribution to the community (that's you :)... We thank you in advance for contributing to the success of this enterprise by sharing it widely and of course chipping in. We're working on bringing some goodies that will be worth your effort!

The Road is Long AND the Way is Free

Meet participants from Africa, Asia, Americas, and of course Europe at FSM 2017. They may be prestigious or unknown, programmers, engineers, philosophers, scientists, artists, and citizens.

Thank you for your attention, and see you in Saint-Étienne next July!